Becoming A Travel Agent 
~  The Scoop  ~

Becoming a travel agent seems like a fun and easy way to earn a living.

We’ve all seen the ads: Work at home. Be an online travel agent in your spare time. Earn commissions from your home computer. Get paid to plan trips for others. And Travel! Travel! Travel!

It seems so easy and enticing. The ads couldn’t be more convincing....

Do you love travel?

Do you get pleasure from planning trips for yourself and others?

Would you like to get paid for a few hours work, with the ability to travel the world – at a discount?

During the years I actively worked in the travel industry, seldom a month went by I didn’t receive at least one call from a someone asking about the ins and outs of becoming a travel agent.

Early on, it was easy to tell these callers the wonderful things they wanted to hear about this fun and exciting industry I was a part of. [Check here for my story.]

I was always truthful: there is no quick and easy way to become an independent travel agent.

But as the calls continued to come, and I became increasingly knowledgeable and experienced in the field, I tried harder to paint a more realistic picture of what was required to be successful in the travel agent business.

I also made it a point to explain the day-to-day reality of actually working as a travel agent.

And what you see on the internet for so many travel agent courses, training programs, or agencies who promise you access to the world of travel vs. the reality of becoming a travel agent who can legitimately function in the industry, are polar opposites.

Beyond Warick and the River Avon

Becoming A Travel Agent ~ The Facts

The sad truth is, there are companies who advertise how you can become a  travel agent with little or no prior knowledge.

Years ago, this was possible – if you knew the right people: a Mom & Pop agency owner who needed warm bodies to staff his office; a small-agency manager, who happened to be your best friend.

You started at the bottom and learned on the job.

Then, there were the online travel agent 'mills' who hired people for a 'fee', prom-ising them 'certification cards' and access to the fascinating world of 'free' and 'discounted' travel.

But they were more about collecting the fees [think multi-level-marketing] than they were about you actually becoming a travel agent.

Most states have now outlawed these types of 'travel agent certification mills' and shut them down for the scams they were.

Maison du Roi - City of Brussels Museum

Today, all you need do is command your favorite search engine to locate articles on 'how to become a travel agent' [or something similar], and you’ll find dozens of companies offering to teach you how to become a travel agent online.

They claim they’ll help you get a license and 'certify' you to become
a home-based travel agent.

Problem is...too many of these com-panies are making bogus claims.

Few U.S. states require licensing of travel agents. [But if you live in a state that does, you'd better do it!]

Others don’t require licensing, per se, but they do require state registration, specific financial compliance, agent bonding, regulatory fees, letters of credit, and certain other security measures to protect consumers.

For instance, California law requires anyone selling travel in their state [whether you’re located there or not] to meet their specific travel-seller registration requirements.

This means, if your Aunt Polly, who lives in Sacramento, asks you to book a flight or a tour for her vacation – and you do – the powers that be in the Golden State will swoop in and shut you down and fine you [or worse] if you don't conform to their particular travel agent requirements.

And while California may be the strictest state at the time of this writing to govern becoming a travel agent, other states have their own individual rules and regulations, all of which – as an independent travel-seller – you are responsible for knowing and abiding by.

Becoming A Travel Agent ~ The Truth

So, what do you need to be a travel agent?

In a word: knowledge.

Becoming a travel agent is a professional endeavor. You don’t become one, because you pay someone a fee.

You also don’t become an online travel agent just because you have a computer at home and sign a form with some company, who tells you that you can sell travel.

Granted, anyone with basic computer skills can book an airline ticket, rent a car, or confirm a hotel room.

But real online travel agent jobs are handled by experienced agents who may choose to work at home, but who are affiliated with legitimate and reputable bona fide travel agencies, with proper staffing and credentials, experienced manage-ment, financial backing, and regulatory approval.

Most have been in the travel agent industry for years, or they've come from another segment of the travel industry at large and have both an experienced passion and a resourced knowledge of the global travel business.

Although it’s not required, many contemporary travel agents are college educated, with accrued business, accounting, management, marketing, and customer-oriented interpersonal skills.

There are even colleges and universities that offer four-year degrees in travel, tourism, and hospitality, including specific travel agent courses.

Further, there are numerous trade, vocational, and technical type schools offering various forms of travel agent education, either as specialty programs or as two-year degrees.

Napolean Ate Here

Finally, there are dedicated and legitimate travel agent schools offering courses, that will train you in the finite skills and requirements you need to become a travel agent.

So, if you've done the proper research, if you've given thoughtful consideration, and then decided that becoming a travel agent is what you want to do - and you’re willing to work hard to do it – check these qualified travel agent schools and learn the right way to gain the know-ledge and expertise you'll need to become successful.

Being a travel agent is hard work, long hours, and [often] low pay.

For the real 'skinny' on becoming a travel agent and whether or not it fits your life plan, check the facts put out by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for a realistic picture of the life [and livelihood] of becoming a travel agent at home – or in a storefront agency.

Like your Mama told you…'There's no free lunch.' And there’s no free travel, either.

The only way to earn free or reduced travel is to become a knowledgeable and experienced accredited travel agent. This is done through the International Air Transport Association [IATA] and any domestic Air Reporting Agencies respective to the country where you live and work.

There’s much more to becoming a travel agent than signing your name, paying a fee, or wishing it was so.

It’s a rewarding field, if you’re up for the challenge, if you're dedicated and self-disciplined, and you're willing to put in the time necessary to learn the craft and get some reputable 'in the field' experience.

Like any other professional field you might consider, becoming a travel agent – and enjoying the fruits of your labor – is difficult work!

But speaking for myself, it was worth it!






Travel Perspectives:
A Guide to Becoming a Travel Agent

An excellent resource of information for anyone planning or studying to become a travel agent - as either an independent contractor online, or in a store front agency .

It will serve as an adjunct to your study materials, exposing you to real-life travel planning situations.

While you can find books that cost more, as well as many that sell for less [you get what you pay for], this book is an invaluable tool if you're serious about becoming an agent.



For information on using travel agents to help you plan your European trip, check these articles:

An Independent Travel Agent may cost you some money. But she may also save your trip! Learn when you need the help of a professional travel agent.

Is using an Online Travel Agent the best strategy? Determine whether using online booking sites is better than choosing an independent travel agent.

Certified Travel Agents often do the best job of helping you plan your overseas trip. But an independent travel counselor with years of  on-th-job experience is worth her weight in gold.

Travel Tip

Becoming a travel agent requires much more than knowing how to book a simple computer travel reservation.

A capable travel agent coordinates detailed overland schedules, creates workable travel itineraries - both domestic and international, evaluates the functionality travel plans, monitors local conditions at home and abroad, develops value-based travel budgets, ferrets out special deals and trip-enhancing programs, creates and coordinates specialty travel programs, and teaches you more than you ever hoped to know about planning a trip abroad.

Only with the breadth of knowledge that comes from experience, longevity, industry access, and personal experience, is it possible to be successful as a travel agent and grow repeat customers, who trust you with their money, their time, and their travel dreams.


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